Arsenal 2-0 Newcastle: Ramsey, Ozil protagonists in win

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It is perhaps understandable that Unai Emery doesn’t want to talk much about the transfer of Aaron Ramsey. There is a kind of madness that can be elicited from trying to understand how Arsenal could let a player of his caliber go.“I think it’s clear. It’s not more for me to speak about that,” said Emery, revealing nothing more than his frustrations at the outcome, of the process perhaps. “The most important thing is he is happy and he is working to help us….. I only can say to Aaron: continue, and continue helping us because we need for this season to do something important. He can be the protagonist to do that.”

Against Newcastle, Ramsey was the protagonist, the instigator for Arsenal’s 2-0 win. It was his goal that allowed the team to breathe, and which, suddenly spark them into life and play the kind of football we saw under Arsène Wenger, interspersed with that typical Emery brutalism. Indeed, that’s one of the less heralded reasons why Ramsey’s such a big loss to Arsenal; his energy, the running from deep from his best position in central midfield, cannot easily be replaced, but he also grew up at the club playing the Arsenal Way, or WengerBall as it is informally known. Thus, it wasn’t just his finish that seemed to galvanise his teammates, but his touch before it, a flick  with the outside of his boot to speed up the attack. It seemed to remind the players that they are the superior team, that there is a way of playing that they are used to that can prise open teams.

Of course, Unai Emery hasn’t forgotten that. In his notes before the game, he said that he wants to give “the club my idea. This process needs time, but above all it’s about respecting the history here of Arsenal, of Arsène Wenger, of the players. Then I can share my ideas to create a new history, a new career, a new way here by being together.”

He adds that he approached the start of his tenure by paying detailed attention the strengths and weaknesses of his “squad and the players”. It’s fair to say that the management of Ramsey and Mesut Ozil hasn’t worked out as planned (though I’d argue the rotation of the latter was needed to some degree), but those players are need to bridge the gap between the new ideas and the old.

Against Newcastle, Arsenal started tentatively in the face what Emery anticipated would be a strong defensive performance from their opponents, and said before the game, the “focus would be on how we can break their defensive positions”. The solution came in the form of Ramsey and Ozil. First, it was the playmaker who decided to take it upon himself to make something happen by aggressively drifting over to the left-side. Here, he’d hope he’d be closer to his teammates – indeed, he is wont to do that many of times, and has affected games this season when he roams laterally – and create overloads to the side of Newcastle’s 5-4-1 system. When the goal came, it started with Ozil dropping deep, and that for a moment, allowed Ramsey to move unopposed between the lines. The pass from Matteo Guendouzi was good, hit with pace so that all Ramsey had to do it lay it off round the corner to Alexandre Lacazette. The touch, however, was superb, setting Lacazette off behind the defence before the ball eventually fell for Ramsey himself to strike home.

After that, Arsenal played some of their best football they have played this season, exchanging lots of quick, one-touch passing. Emery so far has shown that he is committed to a certain way of playing, “to play from the back, from the edge of our box”, says Lacazette, though it tends to be more structured than the free-flowing nature reminiscent of Wenger teams that we saw towards the end of the first-half, and during the first 20 minutes of the second-half (before Lacazette put the game to bed with a clever finish).

Indeed, reading Emery’s notes before the game, it suggests those periods where Arsenal are more considered, at the start of this game, and just before the second goal, are almost planned by Emery. He wants his team to take stock of the game, to try and get a foothold in the match through possession and then use it to impose themselves. “I usually take two moments in the 90 minutes,” he says. “When I need to push and ask the players to take my energy to push a lot. Then in other moments, it’s about being calm to take the moments with the ball and have good combinations like we want. That’s how we create our identity.”

 “I want to take the balance for when we need to push and when we need each player to have my energy to do more in the 90 minutes. Also sometimes, we need to show them or give them that calmness. Above all, we want to use the ball to create the best moments in the attacking third against the opposition.”

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